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Predatism


Predator is the individual who hunts and devours another, called prey, belonging to a different species.

Predators are generally larger and less numerous than their prey, being exemplified by carnivorous animals.

Both predatory and prey populations generally do not go extinct or overpopulate, remaining in equilibrium in the ecosystem. For the human species, predatism, as a limiting factor of population growth, has practically no effect.

  • Mimicry - Mimicry is a form of adaptation revealed by many species that closely resemble others, thus obtaining some advantages.
    The false coral snake is confused with the much feared true coral, and thanks to that, it is not bothered by most other species. There are moths that resemble wasps, and moths whose colors resemble the features of an owl with large, bright eyes.
  • Camouflage - Camouflage is a form of morphological adaptation whereby a species seeks to confuse its victims or aggressors by revealing similar color (s) and / or shape (s) to environmental things. The color pattern of wild cats, such as the maracajá cat and the jaguar, is harmonious with their environment, with spots camouflaging the shading of the deep forest. The same is true of lizards (eg chameleon), which vary from the green color of the leaves to the brown color of the substrate where they are. Polar animals are usually white, mingling with ice. The mantis, which is a powerful predator, resembles leaves or twigs.
  • Aposematism - Aposematism is the same as warning coloring. It is a form of adaptation whereby a species reveals vivid and striking colors to warn its possible predators, who already recognize it for its unpleasant taste or poisons.
    Many butterflies display so-called alert-colored mimetic rings that discourage predator attack. A kind of very conspicuous warning coloring is Dendrobates Ieucomelas, from Amazon, a small colored frog with black and yellow stripes and poisonous.